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Friday, August 14, 2020

Well, that's fucked up

CADDO COUNTY, Okla. (KFOR) – An Anadarko man says he’s grieving the loss of his dog after a nearby rancher shot and killed the canine while the two were out hunting wild hogs in the middle of the night.

The Caddo County District Attorney has chosen to not press charges on the man who pulled the trigger.

“For someone just to shoot him because he’s a dog, kill him because he’s a dog or murder him because he’s a dog, it isn’t right,” Chase Butler said.

Chase Butler of Anadarko says it’s still tough to talk about his best friend, Smoke.
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I've had several hounds run through my property hunting RACcoons and foxes a couple times before, doesn't bother me any. Dogs don't know property lines.

12 comments:

  1. Nope!
    You let your animal run onto someone else’s property. Who probably list expensive livestock to feral dogs, you got to expect this to happen.
    Like people trapped in their vehicles by the rioters. You need to do what you think you need to do to protect yourself.
    Don’t want your dog shot, protect your dog, like the landowner protecting his animals.

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  2. Tough one to take sides on, probably don't have all of the story. Collar and light, pretty clear indication its not "dumped". Dog jumps on the the hood of my truck at night?, on my land with my livelihood, no previous contact with guy hunting hogs?, I'm gonna take that as a threat. From personal experience I will say that contacting landowners PRIOR to running dogs "who don't know property lines" (a true statement) goes a long way towards avoiding this kind of situation.

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  3. Ditto on neighbors dogs.. keep chasing stuff back in the woods, sometimes it comes onto my property... couple .22s in the general direction scares them off good enough.

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  4. While camping in Michigan's state forests, we have had dogs, and hunters, run right through our camp in the night. Hunting raccoons. But on state land it is ill advised to go shooting other people's dogs.

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  5. Same here. Had a couple of coon hunters come through at 2:30 in the morning when I was spending the night at the ranch a while back. I watched them follow the hounds for 45 minutes or so, and when they eventually walked past the house I was on the porch holding the Model 28 and asked them "Can I help you guys?". The reply was "Yeah, we're lost!".

    After pointing them in the right direction off they went.
    I never once considered shooting the dogs. I kind of enjoyed the visit, actually.

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  6. Naw, a dog jumping on the hood of a truck generally means they're glad to see you and want to go for a ride. Rude, yes. Ill intentions, no.

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  7. "Dogs don't know property lines" especially when they start killing your chickens. A guy a few years ago killed his neighbors dog, who was allowed to run loose despite a town ordnance leash law. The dog was attacking his chickens and had already killed one. I'm pretty sure the chicken owner wasn't charged, since there's a state law here about dogs and/or wildlife attacking livestock.

    Nemo

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  8. Yeah, because every feral dog I see has a reflective radio collar on his neck so I know he needs to be shot.

    Some folks are just assholes.

    Rancher is more than likely very well connected with the powers that be in his county, and if the dog owner tried to make something of it, he'd find himself harassed to the point of arrest and buried under the county jail.

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  9. Couple years ago I had several, 5 or 6, beagles come into my yard and started chasing my chickens. I knew who they belonged to, he runs his dogs in the fields behind my property often. Despite my efforts I couldn't get them out my yard, I didn't want to hurt them but I couldn't let them harm my birds so I got my pellet rifle and shot a couple in the back legs. That got them moving along, I told George, their owner, I shot them and why. No serious injuries to the dogs or chickens and now George stops by before he releases his dogs to let me know he's here and I check the gate to my backyard. Responsible ownership of hunting dogs make for better neighbors.
    JD

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  10. I grew up, in part, on a ranch in Oklahoma. This was back in the day when everybody had gun racks in the back of their trucks. The general policy was that if you saw a dog and didn't know who it belonged to, you shot it on the spot. The reason was that city folk would come back out in the country and dump their dogs. They would go feral and end up attacking livestock, expecially cows giving birth. Of course, this was a very sparsely settled area -- my nearest non-relative neighbor was about a mile away -- so we pretty much knew everybody and every domesticated animal in the area.

    When I moved to rural Virginia, things were different. We used to have hunting dogs running through our property all the time. It was wierd. They had radio collars on and all sorts of stuff. I saw more dogs with antennas than without them. In that area, these dogs are protected and are given the right to be on property. You don't have to let people hunt on your property, but the dogs are protected if they start following a deer and end up on your land.

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  11. I grew up, in part, on a ranch in Oklahoma. This was back in the day when everybody had gun racks in the back of their trucks. The general policy was that if you saw a dog and didn't know who it belonged to, you shot it on the spot. The reason was that city folk would come back out in the country and dump their puppies. They would go feral and end up attacking livestock, expecially cows giving birth. Of course, this was a very sparsely settled area -- my nearest non-relative neighbor was about a mile away -- so we pretty much knew everybody and every domesticated animal in the area. Cats were even worse. People dumped kittens out there all the time. I remember coming home one night in the middle of winter and finding six tiny kittens up against the bottom of the garage door trying to get some of the warmth slipping out underneath. By that time I was married; my wife melted and made me take them in. Five of the six died by the next morning -- they were too weak to take the milk I tried to put in their mouths with a syringe. But we kept the last one -- she lived another 13 years.

    When I moved to rural Virginia, things were different. We used to have hunting dogs running through our property all the time. It was wierd. They had radio collars on and all sorts of stuff. I saw more dogs with antennas than without them. In that area, these dogs are protected and are given the right to be on property. You don't have to let people hunt on your property, but the dogs are protected if they start following a deer and end up on your land.

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  12. You doing okay Kenny? Ain't heard from you in a minute.

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