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Wednesday, August 17, 2022

Metro Council Considers Bill That Prohibits License Plate Scanner Use for Enforcement of Tennessee Abortion Laws

Nashville Metro Council is proceeding with legislation prohibiting the use of license plate scanner (LPR) technology to aid in the enforcement of “laws outlawing abortion or outlawing interstate travel to obtain an abortion as an allowed use of LPRs.”

7 comments:

  1. But... it's legal to go out of state... how could they use LPRs to prevent you from leaving for any legal reason?

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  2. Wondering how does a license plate scanner know the vehicle carrying said plate is bound for a state where killing babies is legal? Also, wouldn't use of the plate information for inhibiting interstate commerce trip over that Constitution thingy?

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  3. License plate scanning should be banned everywhere, for any reason less than searching for murderers or Silver Alerts. It's outrageously intrusive. The enforcement purposes they mention seem ridiculously far-fetched. How are they going to link a license plate and driver or passenger to abortion? Seems like multiple links in the chain of evidence are missing right off the bat.

    I'm far from pro-abortion, but I can recognize statist overreach when I see it.

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    1. It's a big hoover for location data, political data, shopping data, social data, really any kind of data. Facial recognition, ALPR, analytics, all of it should be banned from US soil and the face of the earth; it's dangerous to freedom. ALPR is just one more piece of data in a litany of other pieces of data but a powerful one.

      - Arc

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  4. It will be an interesting (Chinese form) legal case, as are most cases resulting from the arrant idiocy of legislators.
    There is a Constitutionally guaranteed right to travel; each State is entitled to make their own laws, subject to Constitutional limits; each State has jurisdiction over acts conducted in that State, but (generally) not over legal acts conducted in other States.
    This portion of the law will fail, as it attempts to criminalize "thought-crime" (intent), for an act that is or may be legal where done.
    There is precedent for such laws, however, in the Federal laws criminalizing "sex tourism" to countries which have age of consent laws differing from the US (Eastern Europe), or non-enforcement of age and prostitution laws, (Thailand, etc).
    The lawyers will make money, and no one else will be happy with the result.
    John in Indy

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    Replies
    1. But it's O.K., because they're going after pedophiles. Everybody hates pedophiles. So now they've set the precedent, who's next? Drug users?

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  5. What amazes me, and is also very telling, is their utter insistence to NOT follow the law.
    We don't care what laws YOU passed, we're going to try to stop you from enforcing it with OUR laws!
    They do not give in, nor give up. Same as with sanctuary laws popping up. 'Spose we should adopt the strategy.

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