Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Orienteering

I've said it before and I'll say it again: If you don't know how to use a map and compass, learn. Too many people rely on GPS nowadays and if things fall apart, the military will more than likely shut down GPS for civilians. Remember, they own those fucking satellites.
The government giveth and the government taketh away.

It's not that difficult to learn to triangulate your position and to shoot an azimuth/back azimuth to get to where you need to be. There's several good websites that'll teach you how and then all you need is a little open country to practice in. After you get confident, move into the woods. There's even orienteering clubs that you can join - learn something and get some exercise at the same time although they tend to freak out when you show up with your web gear and a rifle slung across your back. Just sayin'......
The equipment is cheap - a lensatic compass, a map and a piece of clothesline for a pace cord. You can buy everything you need for under 50 bucks.

10 comments:

Swamprat said...

I'm too old to run and hide and resist WC. Besides, here in Florida, I'm damn sure to old to be headin to the Swamps to make a stand.

I'll just make my stand in my house, if it ever comes to that, and take out as many of the bastards as I can. It ain't gonna be the "Govt" I'm worried about...

Bonnie Gadsden said...

You think a tritium lensatic is worth it? And are there any decent brands besides USGI?

wirecutter said...

Don't know, never used anything but a GI compass. Works fine for me.
I'm sure some of the orienteering sites would be able to answer your questions with a hell of a lot more expertise than I can.

Oswald Bastable said...

never had GPS when I was taught how to make it rain iron in the right place...

dhanna59 said...

WC, the Army has mobile GPS jammers, They use em here at JRTC Ft. Polk during FoF rotations. They are also used in theater against the Muj. They are also about to deploy directed area EMP emitters for specific or area targets. Don't think they won't use em on FreeFor....

Struan Robertson said...

Brings to mind Night Compass March @ ITR Pendleton - buncha recruits stumblin' around in the SoCal mountains. But, we learned. Good advice, WC.

drjim said...

My son and I fall into the "not too bad" category for map and compass use. he made it up to Eagle Scout, and he taught me a lot I didn't know.
I had the "map and compass" training in ground school when I learned to fly, so I understood the basics pretty well, and he taught me the "ground level" view of things.

BG- the Tritium ones are nice, but carry quite a price premium over the "glow in the dark" ones. The paint used on the glow-in-the-dark gets charged up by ultraviolet light, so a brief exposure to a "white" LED will make them nice and bright again. White LEDs are actually blue, with a phosphor inside them that emits "white" light when illuminated with the blue LED, which gives off some UV.
Cup your white LED flashlight over it so the light doesn't leak out, and give it a zap, and it will be bright again.
I have some small one LED "finger lights" that use watch batteries, and they're perfect for "recharging" my watch or compass.

Shell said...

Ditto Swamprat *and* Oswald.

Stretch said...

Them: "What sort of GPS do you have?"
Me: "A compass and USGS topo map."
Them: *blank look*

A GPS is a handy item and, if you've the time, can replace a laser rangefinder. It figures out the distance between points.

Anonymous said...

Ken, the military turned over the GPS business to the Dept of Transportation back in the early 90s so it could become useful to aircraft, trucks, ships and trains as well as tons of other civilian applications. It was actually a good thing because it reduced the size and made it cheaper. I can't agree more about having the ability to read maps. My wife and son can read both UTMs and Lat Longs and can follow almost any map or atlas. Maps always work and never take batteries.

tarheel