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Thursday, April 08, 2021

She's got bigger balls than me


 

26 comments:

  1. And she is cute in the bargain. Hand girl to have around. Depends on the breed of bees. And she did use a smoker to stun them with. Also notice how slow she moves. She knows her way around bees.

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  2. A local bee keeper has hives on my place. Watching him work covered in bees is crazy.

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  3. The only interaction I've ever had with bees was getting stung, but Dad could be around bees, hornets, wasps, whatever and never get touched. Maybe they sense fear. He wasn't afraid of them and I am.

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  4. Wow. There is absolutely no way anyone could ever talk me into doing that. Out near me there is a guy who offers those types of services and I hear he is reasonable. With the worldwide bee shortage, you've got to give a tip of the cap to these people

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    1. Those bee shortages and bee deaths? Mostly found in commercial hives that are shipped all around. Stationary hives or locally moved hives aren't suffering from bee die-offs.

      Yer being hoaxed. Majorly. I have seen more bees in the last 20 years than in the 35 years before. Honeybees are everywhere.

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    2. Where did you find that info?

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    3. Guy I know lost over 30 hives last winter. Only one made it. He takes exceptional care of his bee yard and they still died off. They also are located in one area, never transported to other areas. Foul brood and varroa mites are just as devastating to local apiaries as they are to commercial pollinators.
      My personal experience is losing a hive about every other to every third year. Doesn't seem like a hoax to us.

      Leigh
      Whitehall, NY

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  5. Saving the bees is OK, and if that's your hobby or business, even better. I really do enjoy honey.

    But if somebody says bees are endangered, or there is some sort of plague killing bees, ask them, "What's the price of honey at the grocery store. $5 to $8 per pound?" When it hits $20 or more per pound, I'll agree there's a shortage of honey bees.

    Geek

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    1. It's a green thing to be always talking up some type of creatures being endangered in some way. It is good to care about the environment but that isn't enough for them, everything has to be far worse that it actually is.

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    2. Ah, but how much of that honey is sugar syrup? It's getting to the point where folks can taste the difference.

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  6. My dad kept bees for years. He never wore any of that beekeeper shit, but he had a little smoke pot to calm them down when he’d go to harvest honey. No telling how many times I’ve been stung as a kid. Usually from stepping on them while running around barefoot. Not as bold as this girl or my old man, but I’m willing to work with them in hives. They’re not stupid. They know stinging you is suicide. Eod1sg Ret

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  7. I keep bees and have already been stung once this season doing something far less intrusive than that. She likely got stung, but it makes for good TV.

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    1. I lived across the border in Wayne County during my Jr. High/High School years. Spent most of my high school weekends driving to Static or Bald Rock for beer, assuming the Pickett County in your handle is Pickett County, TN.

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  8. Why don't the bees sting her? I'm sure if I tried that I would be lumps and bumps all over.

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    1. Lack of fear. Bees can sense fear pheromone and respond by stinging to protect the hive. Another reason she didn't get stung is that she's smokin' hot.

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  9. "She's got bigger balls than me"

    Get them stung 50067 times and the sizes will match again...

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  10. There are many stories published about colony collapse disorder. "In California, it tripled pollination fees. Beekeepers charged almond growers $51.99 per hive in 2003. By 2009 that rose to $157.03 a hive. By 2016, that fee increased to prices between $180 and $200 a hive." Insecticides and parasites, maybe. "Colony collapse disorder also affects the beef and dairy industries. Bees pollinate clover, hay, and other forage crops. As they die off, it raises the cost of feedstock. That increases beef and milk prices at the grocery store." It's not just honey.

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    1. That colony collapse? Doesn't happen with stationary hives, just with the mobile hives.

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  11. My God Parents were Bee Keepers. I don't know how many Hive's they maintained but when ever I would visit I would end up leaving with a five gallon bucket of Honey. They had barrels of the stuff there in southern Illinois.

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  12. The lady has a bit of experience. She runs Texas Beeworks in Austin. https://texasbeeworks.com/

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  13. I remember picking up some hives a few years back. The guy loading them was kinda rough and they were stinging him a bit. I was about 10 feet back and some bees got caught in my hair (I had long flowing locks in those days). Not being a bee guy I crushed on that had worked its way to my skull.
    I ended up running along the highway flailing at the bastards as the stung my face and head about 20 times. musta looked pretty funny to passers by since I was right in front of the well labelled bee facility. I wonder to this day if any passers by thought " on second thought maybe we wont stop at that honey place today"

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  14. I am not a huge conservationist, but I also don't kill anything for no reason. That this young lady was able to relocate this hive, intact, is a good thing, in my thinking. Plus, they will provide pollination for some farmer.
    And I would also never get close to them, either. I am the one who would be bait to keep bees away from the person working on the hive, getting stung, so the actual bee keeper could remain pain free.

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  15. I grew-up on a farm.
    I understand this video.

    A few decades ago, I realized I have some kind of peaceful communication with yellow-jackets.
    We live together just fine.
    The uninitiated humans freak anytime they see me discussing our play-time with cordial yellow-jackets.

    Of course, I suggest to individuals in the yellow-jacket community -- they probably ought to avoid most other humans.
    Frightened humans make bad decisions.

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  16. I've done that sort of work, though my brother and I wore full body suits for it. He doesn't anymore, prefering a simple net hat because it's easier to put on and off. I got out and became an electrician when we realized there wasn't going to be enough income for both of us.

    If it was just hive removal, we'd have been fine, as we were quoting our time at around $250/hr (in 2005) but there wasn't enough removal work to keep us busy, and even with retail and 200 hives, it wasn't coming in fast enough.

    He still owns CoPoCo honey in Fort Collins, CO. Nice guy, and THE person to talk to if you want honey, beekeeping equipment, or advice in northern Colorado. Though strangely enough it's my dad teaching the new beekeeper classes these days. Years ago when we were starting, he wouldn't go near them for fear of being stung.

    They've got a website and you can order online - even for propolis, which is IMHO better than antibiotics, and the least known bee product.

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  17. My Papaw in East Tennessee kept bees when I was a kid. I remember him pulling pieces of the comb out of the hive for me to chew on. Precious memories.

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  18. That's just flat out wonderful.

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