Pages

Sunday, May 16, 2021

Sunday Video 5


 

12 comments:

  1. If you've seen the movie Le Mans 66, disc brakes getting red hot and failing was one of the problems that Ford's team were struggling to overcome.

    I have a book about the Le Mans 24 hour races and, as far as I could tell, the film was pretty close to the actual story.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thats what dirt track cars breaks look like. Oh and thanks Kenny, that reminds me I need to replace the bent front disk on my KTM 690.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'd sure like to see what those brake pads looked like after those two 'stops', and know what their thickness was before and after.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Getting that hot, they can't be too far away from the melt point of the steel of the parts that make up the whole package, from brakes, to discs, to calipers, etc. Cast Fe or Grey Fe, if I remember correctly, have a melt point of somewhere around 2360-2400 degrees F.
    The second one was pushing 1900 degrees F. Any possible flaws in the casting of the caliper, could certainly show themselves at that temp, even considering that the part was not as hot as the disc, but perhaps 1400-1500 degrees F.
    Those had to be either racing car brakes, or testing for aerospace braking methods. Either that or for one very heavy weight mover, possibly tractor trailers or some other prototypes.
    That is the limiting factor for jet engines for airplanes. The closer you get to the liquidus point of the alloy, the more rapidly it looses it's strength. That is why the hot engine parts of a jet engine are made in a vacuum furnace, to control the trace, or tramp, elements, that would cause a stress failure. O2 and N2 are the main two, but every other element is strictly controlled as well. The modern alloy for jet engines, is called a single crystal, or single xtal, meaning that instead of forming during the cooling process multiple crystals are formed, in a random patter, or in the previous generation the crystals were formed in a directional pattern, called directionally solidified, the casting is made to form one gigantic crystal, by both the composition of the alloy, and the method of casting, which is done with a gating system that resembles a pigtail, curling in several circles, to force the alloy to flow in a certain pattern.
    I melted several heats of high end alloy that was worth in excess of 10 million dollars per heat. All done through portholes, to see the bath, and the pouring area, where you would pour the metal into heavy walled pipes, which when cooled, were pushed out, making 4" solid bars of vacuum melted steel.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cool stuff, thank you Pigpen!

      Delete
    2. Were you with Carpenter Technology?

      Delete
  5. The caliper is labeled Bugatti, and there’s a Veyron in the background of the computer screen in the split... so not racing brakes, but might as well be,
    I’m betting on a carbon ceramic matrix and not steel of any kind.
    Watch a night F1 race, or even NASCAR, and you’ll see the same phenomenon.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Probably carbon fiber disk.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If carbon fiber pads then those rotors are toast, if the parts store guy trys to sell you carbon fiber pads tell him no, they may last forever but eat rotors!!!!grayman

      Delete
  7. Well fuck a duck.
    Explains dramatically why my accident happened last year.
    =O

    ReplyDelete
  8. How'd they get a live video of my wife driving?

    ReplyDelete
  9. I can always tell when I am following an automatic driven by a rich idiot who uses both feet. Brakes on, accelerating.

    ReplyDelete

I moderate my comments due to spam and trolls. No need to post the same comment multiple times if yours doesn't show right away..