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Sunday, June 13, 2021

Sunday Video 1

 


28 comments:

  1. The bald guy keeps his going too, in between serious hits. Nice tempo. Anybody know what they are making?

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    1. That's what I was wondering, Kenny? No hearing protection, I will never go without, got tired of my Dad not being able to hear his Grand kids very well and tv full blast during the news.

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    2. Looks like a horseshoe to me. OG

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    3. No eye protection, either. Knew two co-workers who didn't wear company supplied eyewear while hiiting on a piece of cold metal (two different incidents), a fleck hit each one in their eye, eventually went blind in that eye. 'White eye' is just weird to see.
      Imagine what a fleck of red hot steel would feel like....

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    4. No OSHA in their neighborhood.

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    5. Yeah, that’s a pet peeve of mine, no eye pro. Seen too many shop accidents to ever go without.

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  2. Well, Dick, I’d give it an 8 ‘cause it’s got a good beat and it’s easy to dance to

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  3. My tinnitus is killing me

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  4. Believe that's one way to turn iron into steel, by literally beating the carbon out if it.

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    1. I actually think that it is backwards. Iron is an element, while steel is an alloy. Adding carbon to iron can make it into a type of steel, either a low carbon steel or a high carbon steel, sometimes called grey iron. Cast Iron is also a form of high carbon steel. So a blacksmith is hammering impurities out of the iron, but not carbon.

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  5. The master (the one with the little hammer) is telling the striker when to hit by tapping his hammer on the anvil. Two taps means hit, one tap means stop. Needless to say these two have worked together before.

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    1. Correct. Just as Japanese sword smiths communicate to their apprentices during forging. Different taps mean different instructions for the apprentice. One of the lesser known practices of forging and smithing.

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  6. They have done that more than once

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  7. Swinging a sledge like that will give you an upper body workout you can't get any other way

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    1. Rowing. Especiallt an old scow which barely makes headway. Rowing sculpts a body from foot to neck.

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  8. Placing a good sized magnet on the body of the anvil will take out the annoying ring sound. Yeah, it's anvil music but; it will become tiresome to listen to and cause hearing damage down the road.

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  9. Old European Blacksmith Signals:
    Five taps - need a striker
    Strike the iron and one tap - strike where I strike
    Tap on the anvil - strike the centre of the anvil / keep striking where you were and I will move the iron around to where I need it hit
    Drag / Multiple strikes across the anvil - strike your last strike until I signal

    The striker is holding his sledge in what would be traditionally deemed incorrect. The left hand goes almost under the right arm pit. This permits the striker to easily view where the sledge is falling and also by means of adjusting the height of the left hand will ensure the face of the sledge will strike flat on the anvil.

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  10. That's one way to avoid the need of a mechanical power hammer!
    Find one that will run cheap, but still do good work.
    -Just A Chemist

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  11. Watched the video, read all the comments and watched it again. Wow! That is something!

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  12. That's how nations are truly built.

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