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Thursday, October 14, 2021

Civil Forfeiture Lawsuit Against Arizona Moving Forward

A federal appeals court has ruled a Washington state couple’s lawsuit against the state of Arizona over what they say was an unconstitutional seizure of their property can continue. 

Terry and Ria Platt loaned their vehicle in 2016 to their son to use on vacation when Arizona state troopers stopped him on Interstate 40 in Navajo County for having tinted windows. A K-9 search discovered a small amount of marijuana in the 2012 Volkswagen Jetta, and police also found $31,000 in cash.

14 comments:

  1. I've traveled with 10s of thousands in cash and even went cross country one time with 25 pounds of 1oz Kugs! Now? When I tell my customers I want to be paid in precious metals but FedEx that shit. No way you should get on the road with assets these scum will steal.

    What in the hell has happened?

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    1. We got smarter.
      - The Cops

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  2. The key element is even if they are innocent THEY NEED TO SUE TO GET THIER PROPERTY BACK.

    Yes that is yelling. But you are still screwed. Jack booted thugs rule Arizona and I, for one, will never visit that state. Getting to be more of them I won’t go to.

    We are fucked at every turn with this government.

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    1. I don't believe that civil asset forfeiture laws are unique to Arizona.

      But it wasn’t until the mid-1980s that civil asset forfeiture took on a life of its own in the U.S. That’s when Congress established the Assets Forfeiture Fund, which allowed federal agencies to keep proceeds from seized assets. Wanting to get in on the action, the states quickly followed Congress’ lead and established programs that incentivized law enforcement agencies to use the civil asset forfeiture apparatus to enrich themselves. (https://www.criminallegalnews.org/news/2018/feb/16/civil-asset-forfeiture-unfair-unjust-un-american/)

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  3. After SHTF, that's one of the laws that needs to be taken off the books. The Rule of Law has ceased to exist since asset forfeiture and prosecutorial discretion were brought into existence.

    Nemo

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  4. You know it's bad when even the Kommie Kanadian gummint is warning folk about travelling in the lower 48 with large amounts of cash, preloaded CC's (apparently they can empty those if they find them), etc.

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  5. Even if these victims of state sanctioned theft win in court they still lose. The cost of the lawsuit will be far more than the cost of the property stolen. And the criminals pinned no a badge will suffer ZERO consequences for their crimes an theft.

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  6. They got the car back, but never said what happened to the $31,000???

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    1. I thought the same thing. And all the defense was asking for was $1, admit they were wrong and an apology. So where’s the $31k
      MadMarlin

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    2. Hookers and blow, baby. Hookers and blow.
      - Arizona State Police

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  7. One of my main issues against Trump (even as a mostly supporter) was his continuation of such nonsense.

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  8. It'd be nice if Tennessee would follow suit, but I ain't holding my breath.
    --Tennessee Budd

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  9. At some point this will end with dead pigs strewn across the landscape - too bad....

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  10. Cash is detectable with the proper "instruments". If you travel on roadways with mucho dinero, best have a cloaking device. Ohio Guy

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I moderate my comments due to spam and trolls. No need to post the same comment multiple times if yours doesn't show right away..