Pages


Tuesday, September 27, 2022

Can we evacuate from hurricanes in electric vehicles?

As emergency coordinators across the U.S. prepare for the upcoming hurricane season, they are busy planning evacuation routes. Currently, these plans don’t anticipate the needs of people driving electric vehicles, which have shorter driving ranges than gas vehicles and require recharging at stations with charging ports. Civil and environmental engineering professor Eleftheria Kontou spoke with News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian about this issue and her newly published study.
-WiscoDave

*****

Let's see how smug and self righteous the owners are when they get stranded.

18 comments:

  1. Sorta like the guy that got stranded at the COAL MINE?????

    ReplyDelete
  2. " ... ir use a secondary vehicle with larger driving range."

    Is it too difficult to say internal combustion engine?
    Why, yes it is. At least for those who promote EV and receive grants for the same.

    It seems Dr. Expert, PhD is promoting more charging stations closer together along the designated routes. Thats the kind of talk you'd expect from academics. They are largely separate from the engineers who actually make the electric system; the ones responsible for increasing battery range.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those that can't do, teach (or get a PhD).

      Delete
  3. I recall reading that during a hurricane evacuation years ago Tesla sent a wireless update to unlock the last few percent of the battery to increase the range before requiring a charge. So, they have a way to nibble at the margins, but if/when the grid goes down the generator keeping a gas station alive is NOT going to be available to charge any EVs. Start walking!

    ReplyDelete
  4. "Can we evacuate from hurricanes in electric vehicles"?

    Yes yes yes yes yes. Those 250 miles per hour winds will make those windmills spin so fast it will take only seven hours for a charge your battery instead of eight.
    What????
    The hurricane is two hours away?????

    Let's talk about Trump.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The local grid is typically shut down as the storms approach, to soften the impact to the grid, avoid unnecessary expendses, mitigate hazards, and to lessen the chances of fires. After the storm has passed there may be some areas without power for several weeks. Electric vehicles would not be convienient for long. EVs are just one more example of a DemonicRat Highly Polished Glitter Turd. They always tell you that it's okay to pick it up by the clean end, YO!. Everyone with half a brain knows better. It's a TURD! Push them off to the side of the road and let the traffic flow past. Libs will never Learn, they will grab a turd every time...

    ReplyDelete
  6. Traffic is heavy on I-75 northbound through Ocala but looks like it’s doing ok past Gainesville. I cannot imagine being stuck in this traffic in an EV with no way of quickly recharging.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We left Saint Pete for my Mom’s house in Tennessee mid-day yesterday , once we figured the mandatory evacuation order was coming down. Got caught in bumper-to-bumper on I-75 evacuating from Irma. Not doing that again.

      Delete
  7. File the widespread adoption of electric vehicles under “ideas so stupid only academics and government officials believe them.” MartyB

    ReplyDelete
  8. Living in South Florida, after the storm and the resultant and common loss of power, I will be offering my spare generator to Tesla owners at an outrageously inflated price. Their smug dollars will buy me a LOT of ammunition.

    ReplyDelete
  9. In the near immortal words of Earl Dibbles Jr.
    "Shouda got a car that you don't plug in!"
    -Just a Chemist

    ReplyDelete
  10. Maybe, just maybe when people start dying because of this stupidity their eyes will open. But it’s really, really hard to believe they will learn anything!

    ReplyDelete
  11. It'll work out fine if ya have a long enough extension cord

    ReplyDelete
  12. Piss on the fools with electric cars. I worry about them blocking the roadways with their pieces of shit and the smart people caught up in traffic jams.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Can they be pushed to the side of the road if they run out of juice or do they just lock up in place?
      I got the impression that it was the latter during the I-95 winter jam between DC and Richmond VA.
      Not good if they block traffic....

      Delete
  13. Now see all you guys are missing a golden opportunity here!!
    A Duce with a 22k genny in the back a 150 diesel tank to keep it running. Have 4 charging ports at full voltage. Charge each vehicle a flat 500 for an hours worth of charge!
    Just saying hehe

    ReplyDelete
  14. Saw a car on the interstate the other day. The plate said FUEL LOL. Yes, it was a Tesla. We had a laugh thinking about that driver during the first good winter storm. . .

    ReplyDelete
  15. Your great statesman Benjamin Franklin showed the way.
    Every battery electric car should be provided with a big kite, tethered with a metal and nylon stranded cord to the charger socket.
    First sign of a thunderstorm fly that kite and that vehicle will be flying.

    ReplyDelete

I moderate my comments due to spam and trolls. No need to post the same comment multiple times if yours doesn't show right away..