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Tuesday, June 22, 2021

The shit I post on Facebook

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35 comments:

  1. #14. No. You don't want someone that is that clingy.

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  2. All of my cars, trucks. motorcycles and tractors were Made in USA so I dont need a 10MM for any reason so whenever I find one, I put it in the trash

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    1. You must be perfectly happy carrying a 9mm then?

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    2. I bet you do unless they were all made over 40 years ago.

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    3. You must have cars, trucks, and motorcycles made over 40 years ago. since no vehicles have been totally made in the U.S.A. Lots of parts are made in Canada, Mexico, and of course, China. Think China for the electronics.

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    4. Alan is right, I call bullshit on that

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    5. Almost all of the cars I drive are from the 1930s and 1950s. I do have a 66 Chrysler Convertible but rarely drive it. Motorcycles 1920s to 1950s. Tractors 1940 to the 1975 backhoe.

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    6. Didn’t Jeff Cooper develop the 10mm? He called it something else IIRC, but I recall the cartridge being developed in the US.

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    7. Yep. Have had a GM product that was half Standard and half Metric. Always a fun thing to work on.

      Motherfuckers. Wiring Hecho en Mehico, assembled in Canada, engine from the USA. Fuck...

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    8. Beans, my beloved 1980 Chevy “Big 10” was half American standard, half metric, half Phillips head and half Torx!

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    9. pkerot, i know you...

      same guy who's thinkn bout goin fishn one day, but all his poles are at ma's house uppin o'hia

      right next to his harley and huntin rifles...

      god bless you and your non-metric tool set that's missin its 1/4", 1/2" and spark plug sockets


      use them needle nose on everything, champ

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    10. I remember a story someone related on a message board I was reading about 20 years ago. He was European, and bought himself an American car. He was into American cars, and was finally able to by one. He was going to do some work on it so he went ought and bought an SAE wrench set. He goes to take a part off. The very first bolt he tries to remove turns out to be metric. So he reasons "The Americans finally went metric on their cars, cool" so he takes his SAE set back and gets a metric set. (anyone who has worked on and american car in the last few decades has already figured out the punchline) He gets his shiny new metric wrench set to work on his American car and comes home and removes the bolt. Guess what happened with the very next bolt he tried to remove. Sure enough, it was SAE. He then went on an extended rant about it. I wish I could find it again. It was epic.

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    11. I would love to read that. I had a Saab in the shop that was half sae half metric. even the radiator hose was metric on one end and sae on the other. what a mess. it felt like gm bought Saab just so they could finally use up a few warehouses of outdated Delco components.

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  3. I got a 10mm but it's a quarter inch drive.

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  4. I've been cleaning out the homestead in preparation to sell and leave this cesspit. I actually lost count of the 10mm found in the weirdest spots in the garage.

    ~Unclezip

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  5. If she seeing your personal "tool", 10mm is pretty dang small.

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  6. I still have all three 10mm sockets for all three drive sizes...

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    1. Then evidently you do not use them!!!!grayman

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    2. How did you find a 10mm in 3/4" and 1"-drive?

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    3. I worked on bikes and cars, not buses and trucks.

      I didn't say how many I've expended to have the ones I still have. :-)

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  7. Yer on a roll today, Kenny, I can even share many of these memes with my wife! Thanks, bro, really!

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  8. Strangely enough, I have an EXTRA 10mm in my toolkit and I STILL have no idea where it came from!

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  9. “Cocaine’s a hell of a drug.” Rick James. 9mm Lugar came out a couple of years before .45 ACP. I like em both.

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  10. #1 Ahh, the wrench. Yes, air soluble. Like springs and whatever else you only have one of.

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  11. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  12. All 3 of my 10mm wrenches are the same brand as my tools but not the same series. The same goes for all the 10mm sockets. I have lost count of how many times I have replaced them.

    On another note, I had a tech that lost his 10mm sockets as much as I did. He bought 5. I spot welded them on his 1/4 ratchet, 3/8 breaker bar, 3/8 ratchet, and the last two inside his socket drawer. All of the spot welds were on the inside. That was 5 years ago. The only ones he has now are welded in his socket drawer.

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  13. # 9 Obviously not Cali. Would have been issued a Cali DL, voting rights, ebt, unemployment and blue badge of grift. OTOH WAS mansplaining and taking up two seats.

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  14. I'm NOT a mechanical engineer. So, I marvel at the standard non standard tools. Three sets of wrenches? I do not understand the absolute stupidity of using three or even two standards for tools and parts. If nothing more, you only need one set of tools. For closers, all the same screw will get you out of trouble. Did you see what I did there. 10 mm uncle uncle uncle. Succinctly the Japanese call slotted screws minus and philips" plus. Prove me wrong. Diversity and equality be damned in my workspace. Wasn't it during Lincoln's tenure that the USA recognized the metric system? The metric system is based on man's law (base ten, not base 21) While SAE is based on God's law 3 12 60. Who you gonna call? Knuckle dusters?

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    Replies
    1. Depends on what you work on. Used to be life was easy, just god old USA SAE for everything. Then the auto industry started creeping in the metric stuff, cars had both SAE and Metric on em, which was a pain. Then I bought a little British car and learned all about BSW (British Standard Whitworth). And to confuse you even more, the threads on BSW nuts are almost identical to metric only with a slightly different thread profile. Can't count the number of times I put a metric nut or bolt on what was a Whitworth tapped thread. Then of course you need at least 3 drive sizes if not 5 (have a 3/4" drive set just for when someone brings in a truck with an issue. Bigger than that I don't want to deal with.

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  15. I was an engineer in the UK and mostly only used metric wrenches. I still had my old AF wrenches from way back though. Our company started selling machinery from the US and I had to dust them off again. The thing that struck me was that threads weren't standardised. Metric screws are all a standard pitch, with a finer and courser type for certain specialist applications. The US stuff often had bolts that looked identical but had a slightly different thread. I also needed a much bigger set of Allen keys because the sizes went up in increments of a sixty-fourth of an inch. Metric ones go up in increments of 1mm which is about a twenty-fifth of an inch.

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  16. I still have my 40+ year old Britool 3/8" drive socket set and the only item I have had to replace was the 10mm socket. It may have been hammering it onto an imperial bolt that did it . . . .

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    1. Those of us in the trades have long known that little trick to “finish off” a worn tool. Tool truck guy just used to laugh at us. (Slightly oversized fastener ground just a bit to start then slam with a hammer will split just about all of them, impact sockets are a bitch but can be done). 🏴‍☠️ Bert

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  17. Hmmm. My ice cubes taste funny.

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